“When She Plays We Hear the Revolution”: Girls Rock Regina - A Feminist Intervention

Charity Marsh

Abstract


In this article, I analyze the ways in which community-based arts projects have the potential to challenge the gendered power dynamics of the music industries by creating productive spaces that encourage accessibility, promotion of female artists, and connection amongst girls and female-identified professionals. Specifically, I share my reflections on the inaugural Girls Rock Regina (GRR) camp, which took place in July 2017 in Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. Drawing on interview data collected from the GRR organizing crew, participating musicians, volunteers and campers, as well as from my participatory experience as Canada Research Chair in Interactive Media and Popular Music, and Director of the IMP Labs whose research often focuses on community arts-based research in popular music genres and creative technologies, I highlight the ways in which hegemonic ideas around the gendering of creativity, music technologies, and the music industries are being challenged.

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References


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Web Sources

PinkNoise: www.pinknoise.org Accessed 13 August 2018

Filmography

Play Your Gender. 2016. Dir. Stephanie Clattenburg. Nava Projects.

Interviews

Amber Goodwyn. 2017. Interview by Charity Marsh, Regina, 29 July.

Amanda Scandrett. 2017. Interview by Charity Marsh, Regina, 2 August.

Brittany McFarlane. 2017. Interview by Charity Marsh, Regina, 24 July.

Beth (pseudonym). 2017. Interview by Charity Marsh, Regina, 29 July.

Cassandra Ozog. 2017. Interview by Charity Marsh, Regina, 26 July.

Carly (pseudonym). 2017. Interview by Charity Marsh, Regina, 27 July.

Danielle Sakundiak. 2017. Interview by Charity Marsh, Regina, 3 August.

Jay Kovach. 2017. Interview by Charity Marsh, Regina, 25 July.

Jen Moser Aikman. 2017. Interview by Charity Marsh, Regina, 26 July.

Kaitlyn, 2017. Interview by Charity Marsh, Regina, 27 July.

Kristina Hedlund, 2017. Interview by Charity Marsh, Regina 27 July

Meghan Nash. 2017. Interview by Charity Marsh, Regina, 25 July.

Melanie Hankewich. 2017. Interview by Charity Marsh, Regina, 25 July.




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