REVIEW | Ludomusicology: Approaches to Video Game Music

Sam Cleeve

Abstract


Michiel Kamp, Tim Summers & Mark Sweeney
Sheffield: Equinox, 2016
ISBN: 9781781791981 (PB)
10.5429/2079-3871(2017)v7i1.11en

Keywords


Ludomusicology; Music; Video Games

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References


Collins, K. 2008. Game Sound: An Introduction to the History, Theory, and Practice of Video Game Music and Sound Design. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Ermi, L. and F. Mäyrä. 2005. “Fundamental Components of the Gameplay Experience: Analysing Immersion.” In Changing Views: Worlds in Play. Selected Papers of the 2005 Digital Games Research Association’s Second International Conference, edited by S. de Castell and J. Jenson. Vancouver. http://www.digra.org/wp-content/uploads/digital-library/06276.41516.pdf (accessed June 9, 2017).

Grimshaw, M. (ed.) 2011. Game Sound Technology and Player Interaction: Concepts and Developments. Hershey: Information Science Reference.

Whalen, Z. 2004. “Play Along – An Approach to Videogame Music.” Game Studies 4(1). http://www.gamestudies.org/0401/whalen/.

Whalen, Z. 2007. “Film Music vs. Video-Game Music: The Case of Silent Hill.” In Music, Sound and Multimedia: From the Live to the Virtual, edited by J. Sexton, pp. 68–81. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.

Harmonix 2005, Guitar Hero, video game, PlayStation 2, RedOctane, United States.

Slightly Mad Studios 2011, Shift 2: Unleashed, various platforms, Electronic Arts, United States.

Jason Graves. 2008. Dead Space Original Video Game Soundtrack. Electronic Arts, November 11, United States.




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