Vol 6, No 2 (2016)

Perspectives on Popular Music and Sound Recording

This special issue addresses the multiple relationships between popular music and sound recording in the construction of popular music and its cultures. Samantha Bennett elucidates the impact of time-based signal processors on the shape of four alternative rock recordings; Eve Klein interrogates the ways virtual instrument software challenges notions of human musical expressivity; Landon Palmer examines the production of liveness in recordings of late 60s North American rock festivals; Brett D. Lashua and Paul Thompson show how mythic representations of creativity influence musicians’ expectations of recording processes; Lori Burns considers the concept album in relation to the complex networks of promotional and supplementary materials; Gregory Weinstein argues that the sound of the breath is essential to embodied presence in recordings; Maarten Michielse makes a case for a ‘digital recording consciousness’ present in the mashup community; Alexander C. Harden addresses the emergence of 1970s kosmische musik in the context of the post-war attraction to emerging electronic music technologies in West Germany. The discussion is enhanced by a range of related book reviews.

Editor
Prof Hillegonda C Rietveld

Special Issue Editors:
Dr Samantha Bennett
Dr Eve Klein

Additional Editors
Dr William Echard
Dr Carlo Nardi

Reviews Editor
Sarah E Raine

Assistant Editor
Dr Jacopo Tomatis


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Table of Contents

Editorial

IJ Editor
PDF
1-2

Articles – Special Issue

Samantha Bennett
PDF
3-21
Eve Klein
PDF
22-48
Landon Palmer
PDF
49-69
Paul Thompson, Brett Lashua
PDF
70-90
Lori Anne Burns
PDF
91-116
Gregory Weinstein
PDF
117-138
Maarten Michielse
PDF
139-153
Alexander C Harden
PDF
154-173

Reviews

Sean Albiez
PDF
174-176
Peter Elsdon
PDF
177-180
Timothy Laurie
PDF
181-184
Donald Weston Harper
PDF
185-188
Ann Werner
PDF
189-191
Ariane Gruet-Pelchat
PDF
192-195
Michael Drewett
PDF
196-197