IASPM Journal

IASPM Journal is the peer-reviewed open-access e-journal of the International Association for the Study of Popular Music (IASPM) –– its members are invited to register and publish. Click here for a copy of the CFP (in several languages) and Style Guide.

Announcements

 

Update: 11.2 (2021) Special Issue: Popular Music, Decolonization and Indigenous Studies

 
This Special Issue (11.2) of IASPM Journal aims to contribute to an ongoing process of decolonization through the lens and practices of popular music by highlighting Indigenous academics, theorists and musical explorations. The issue contains six articles and five book reviews.

Liz Przybylski explores “Indigenous survivance” through what she calls “sonic sovereignty” which is the ability to frame how one is heard. Jon Bullock engages with Indigeneity discourse itself, offering a study on the early history of Kurdish Radio Baghdad. Israel Holas Allimant and Sergio Holas look at a 1970’s Chilean Psychedelic Rock band Los Jaivas, showing how their incorporation of Indigenous ways of being decolonize mainstream conceptions of the Chilean subject (as Andean, not dis-placed European). Ryan Shuvera offers an account of Inuk popular music artist and throat singer, Tanya Tagaq, looking in particular at the artist’s 2016 cover of Nirvana’s “Rape Me.” Ann Werner discusses the 2019 pop/hip hop album of one of the most well-known Sámi artists in Sweden, Maxida Märak, through an Indigenous feminist lens.

Ismael de Oliveira Gerolamo's article, in the Open Section of the Issue, analyzes the third album of the Brazilian singer Nara Leão.

Nico Thom reviews a book on Eastern European popular music. Marie Thompson reviews Dylan Robinson's Hungry Listening. Michael Ahlers reviews a field guide to understanding records. Benjamin Burkhart's review covers rap music's flow and rhythm. Sergio Pisfil reviews Carlos Torres Rotondo's Demoler: El Rock en el Perú 1965-1975 about the Peruvian rock scene.

Click here to access this issue.
 
Posted: 2021-12-22
 

Update: Special Issue: Crises at Work: Potentials for Change?

 
This special issue (11.1) consists of five articles, four statements (including a podcast) and two book reviews. Iain A. Taylor, Sarah Raine, and Craig Hamilton examine the UK live music industry during the COVID-19 pandemic and potential implications for social change. Magdalena Fürnkranz covers the live music scene in Vienna during the global pandemic. Melanie Ptatscheck discusses the mental health crisis concerns of EDM DJs related to COVID-19. Marco Antonio Juan de Dios Cuartas considers paradigm shifts in music production during the pandemic. Wonseok Lee and Grace Kao consider the power of fans through a case study of K-pop, BTS and BTS ARMYs in relation to #BlackLivesMatter.

There is a podcast by Ioannis Tsioulakis on the politics of solidarity in Greece during the pandemic. Martin Lücke's statement considers the need for cultural policy changes in Germany. Jason Huxtable calls for accountability in white academics' work on popular music and Mirko Hall champions Hip Hop models of social change as powerful templates for hope.

Nabeel Zuberi and Giacomo Bottà offer their insights on new books out in two reviews.

Click here to access this issue.
 
Posted: 2021-10-14
 

Special CFP: Practice Based Research

 
Special Issue Editors:
Laura Jordán González, Simon Zagorski-Thomas, Anthony Kwame Harrison, and Mary Fogarty

IASPM Journal is the peer-reviewed open-access e-journal of the International Association for the Study of Popular Music (IASPM). As part of an international network, the journal aims to publish research and analysis in the field of popular music studies at both global and local levels.

The 21st century has seen a huge rise in practical and vocational courses in popular music, which is yet to be matched by a similar increase in research into and about practice. Philip Ewell’s plenary talk on ‘Music Theory’s White Racial Frame’ at the 2019 SMT conference made the point that it was not enough to look at a more culturally diverse range of repertoire through conventional theoretical lenses. It is also necessary to develop theory which goes beyond the practices and values of Western Art Music. Similar conceptual breadth should be applied to existing theories of performance, songwriting, the business of music and the uses of technology. This themed issue of the IASPM journal seeks to explore this practical turn in popular music studies through the aesthetics, the pragmatics and the politics of ‘doing’ popular music.

Proposals might include, but are not limited to:
• Music theory and pedagogy in popular music(s)
• Judgments of value or quality in popular music practice
• Movement, dance and the presentation of the persona
• Theorising virtuosity
• Using (and being used by) technology
• How can and/or should music make money?
• Theorising creativity
• Power and influence in popular music practices
• Modes of communicating popular music scholarship

To be considered for this Special Issue, please submit the following by September 1, 2021:
● an abstract of 150-250 words (plus references, if necessary)
● author name(s)
● institutional affiliations
● contact details
● a brief bio of no more than 150 words (which includes the author’s positionalities in relation to their topic)

Submissions should be entered via this online form (https://forms.gle/ZitHPoQuyuKccExx5).

If your abstract is accepted, we expect to receive the full article uploaded into the online submission by June 1, 2022, at https://iaspmjournal.net/index.php/IASPM_Journal/about

The issue will be published in early 2023.

See the journal site for further information regarding Submissions. Click here for a Style Guide.

NOTE: In order to submit to IASPM Journal you must be an IASPM member and registered as an author on the site.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact the special issue editors at iaspmj.pr@gmail.com
 
Posted: 2021-07-06
 

New Position: Call for Applications: IASPM Journal Editorial Board Members

 
Two positions are now available on the IASPM Journal Editorial Board. The duration of the terms will be October 1, 2021-October 1, 2025. If you are interested, please fill out the questionnaire available here
by August 1st 2021. We will announce the results of this call by October 2021. All editorial work is carried out online, via the OJS (Online Journal System), from the preliminary reading of submissions, the peer-review stage and editorial decision-making, to copyediting, layout and final proofreading.

Although we have a robust editorial board team at the moment, most members began at the same time, so the call for two new positions at this time is to ensure a smooth rotation of editorial board members in coming years.

Expectations of the editorial board involve copyediting and proofing articles that have gone through the peer review system, consulting at our annual board meetings, and contributing to other aspects of the journal. Members of our team without English language editing skills have also aided in calls for editorial board members and implementing internal guidelines for editorial board members, for example.

We encourage applications from within the body of IASPM members. Although the form asks for transparency of past experience, we also strive for a balance of training opportunities and expertise amongst board members. We also hope to represent as many of our branches, subject interests, and cultural backgrounds as possible within our board membership. This competition will be discussed within the Editorial Board, especially with regard to diversity, academic qualification and editorial experience.

Please find the requirements for the members of IASPM Journal Editorial Board:
• has a good knowledge of, and specialism in, the field of popular music studies;
• has good communication skills, and a working understanding of multicultural contexts, preferably with good control of the English language, and ideally at least one other IASPM branch language;
• has good organisational skills, is able to take initiative and is able to deliver to deadline;
• the position is usually held for 4 years, plus a 6-month handing-over period;
• can support guest editors in producing special topic issues and encouraging article submissions;
• can, in collaboration with the Chief Editor, act as Editor of article submissions;
• can, in collaboration with the Assistant Editors, ensure that accepted articles are processed adequately through copyediting, proofing and layout stages.

If you have some questions about the application process, do not hesitate to contact IASPM Journal editorial board members: Isabel Ferrer Senabre (isabel.ferrer.senabre@gmail.com) and Marija Dumnić Vilotijević (marijadumnic@yahoo.com).

General enquiries can also be fielded by our Editor-in-Chief, Mary Fogarty (maryf@yorku.ca)

Kind regards,
Editorial Board of IASPM Journal
 
Posted: 2021-06-29 More...
 

Update: Vol 10, No 2 (2020) Open Issue

 
This issue consists of four articles and five book reviews. Kai Arne Hansen discusses children's involvement in debates about climate change through music and music videos in Norway. Luiz Costa-Lima Neto analyzes the music and musical inspirations of Hermeto Pascoal, alongside his coined term "Som da Aura." Benjamin Hillier and Ash Barnes unpack the right-wing ideologies of Australian black metal bands, Spear of Longinus and Deströyer 666, covering the texts, paratexts, rationale of artists, and fan engagement. Sergio Mazzanti analyzes the output of the Russian rock band, DDT, and discusses the use of self-quotation by the bandleader to understand Russian history and his own life.

There are also reviews by Monika Schoop, Antti-Ville Karja, Settimio Palermo, Mark Pedelty and Sergio Pisfil of new books about popular music in a Philippine prison video, cultural mapping and musical diversity, the politics of hope, the political ecology of music, and rap music and audiences.

Click here to access this issue.
 
Posted: 2020-12-10
 

Special CFP: Dance and Protest (2022)

 
Special Issue Editors:
Serouj Aprahamian, Shamell Bell, Rachael Gunn, and MiRi Park

The recent succession of protests and uprisings following the murder of George Floyd at the hands of (now former) Minneapolis police officers overwhelmingly included dance as a protest tactic. While dancers have long engaged in cultural acts of resistance, this iteration in the #blacklivesmatter movement stemmed directly from the efforts of dancers/activists who participated in the protests following the deaths of Trayvon Martin, Ezell Ford, and Michael Brown. Dancer/activist/scholar/mother Shamell Bell deemed "Street Dance Activism" as a protest tool to celebrate Black Joy in the face of Black death, and renowned dance scholar Brenda Dixon-Gottschild has noted how such actions have gained increasing visibility over the last decade.

Internationally, we have also seen the rise of dance actions such as the Māori haka performed in honor of and in solidarity with the victims of the Aotearoa/New Zealand mosque attacks, traditional Kurdish folk forms performed in protest over Turkish cultural repression, Chilean flash mobs mobilized against patriarchy and sexual violence, and the return of Hong Kong’s pro-democracy umbrella movement as a massive choreography of protest. Whether evoking emotions of pain and frustration or joy and exaltation, such displays link people together in a common cause, and draw attention to global struggles for political and social change. What’s more, the soundtrack of the protests, such as folk songs, African drumming, chants, anthems, and popular music, situates these actions within larger histories of rebellion and resistance.

This Special Issue of the IASPM Journal aims to gather a broad range of scholarly and artistic perspectives on the topic of dance and protest, and the ways in which they interrelate, overlap, intertwine, and bolster political expression. We invite submissions that assess dance in relation to historical movements for social justice and grapple with questions related to how dance and music amplify each other within the framework of protests. We invite case studies that examine how dance is used at protests to enhance a political message, facilitate a call to action, unite people in solidarity, as well as examples of viral dances used for political means. We are interested in how protests themselves can be examined as a form of performance, and the potential limitations of performance as protest, especially when not linked to organized struggle. We encourage submissions on Indigenous experiences with dance, as well as the appropriation and commercialization of political dance and music.

Submissions may consider, but are not limited to, any of the following topics:
● The interrelationship between dance, music, and protest
● Case studies of dance and protests (including TikTok / viral dances)
● Dance as a call to action
● Indigenous dance and activism
● Protests as performance
● The policing of the dancing body
● The commercialization and appropriation of dance and cultural activism

More than a call for papers, however, this Special Issue is a CALL TO ACTION! As such, we invite two types of submissions: 1) Full articles, 2) Statements/Actions.

1) Full articles
These submissions will be between 6,000-8,000 words and subject to double-blind peer review. We encourage practice-based and practice-led research submissions.

2) Statements/Actions
These submissions are by scholars and/or practitioners (industry, education, administration, policymakers, etc.) about their dance/music activism experiences in the form of text (max. 2,000 words), audio (max. 12 minutes), or video (max. 8 minutes). The statements/actions will be subject to editorial review.
● This is a call to action, so if you would like your submission to be a part of a video collage of all submissions, please indicate this in your application. To be clear, we will select, subject to review, 1-3 video statements to be featured in full.

To be considered for this Special Issue, please submit the following by February 15, 2021:
● an abstract of 150-250 words (plus references, if necessary)
● author name(s)
● institutional affiliations
● contact details
● a brief bio of no more than 150 words (which includes the author’s positionalities in relation to their topic)

Submissions should be entered via this google form: https://forms.gle/RpcCxjBfMsB5Z1Qq8.

If your abstract is accepted, we expect to receive the full article or statement uploaded into the online submission by August 1, 2021, at https://iaspmjournal.net/index.php/IASPM_Journal/about
The issue will be published in 2022.
See the journal site for further information regarding Submissions. Click here for a Style Guide.
 
Posted: 2020-12-06 More...
 
More Announcements...

Vol 11, No 2 (2021): Special Issue: Popular Music, Decolonization and Indigenous Studies

Editor: Mary Fogarty
Guest Editors: Arcia Tecun and Kirsten Zemke
Assistant Editor: Raquel Campos Valverde

This Special Issue of IASPM Journal aims to contribute to an ongoing process of decolonization through the lens and practices of popular music by highlighting Indigenous academics, theorists and musical explorations. The issue contains six articles and five book reviews. Liz Przybylski explores “Indigenous survivance” through what she calls “sonic sovereignty” which is the ability to frame how one is heard. Jon Bullock engages with Indigeneity discourse itself, offering a study on the early history of Kurdish Radio Baghdad. Israel Holas Allimant and Sergio Holas look at a 1970’s Chilean Psychedelic Rock band Los Jaivas, showing how their incorporation of Indigenous ways of being decolonize mainstream conceptions of the Chilean subject (as Andean, not dis-placed European). Ryan Shuvera offers an account of Inuk popular music artist and throat singer, Tanya Tagaq, looking in particular at the artist’s 2016 cover of Nirvana’s “Rape Me.” Ann Werner discusses the 2019 pop/hip hop album of one of the most well-known Sámi artists in Sweden, Maxida Märak, through an Indigenous feminist lens. Ismael de Oliveira Gerolamo's article, in the Open Section of the Issue, analyzes the third album of the Brazilian singer Nara Leão. Nico Thom reviews a book on Eastern European popular music. Marie Thompson reviews Dylan Robinson's Hungry Listening. Michael Ahlers reviews a field guide to understanding records. Benjamin Burkhart's review covers rap music's flow and rhythm. Sergio Pisfil reviews Carlos Torres Rotondo's Demoler: El Rock en el Perú 1965-1975 about the Peruvian rock scene.


Editor
Dr. Mary Fogarty

Guest Editors
Dr. Arcia Tecun
Dr. Kirsten Zemke

Assistant Editor
Dr. Raquel Campos Valverde

Additional Editors
Dr. Christina Ballico
Dr. Nick Braae
Dr. Raquel Campos Valverde
Dr. Helen Davies
Dr. Richard Elliott
Dr. Mary Fogarty
Dr. Laura Jordán González
Dr. Jon Stewart
Dr. Gayle Wald

Translations Editor
Dr. Laura Jordán González

Reviews Editor
Dr. Richard Osborne

Layout Editor
Dr. Raquel Campos Valverde

Table of Contents

Editorial

Kirsten Zemke, Arcia Tecun
PDF
1-4

Articles – Special Issue

Liz Przybylski
PDF
5-21
Jon Bullock
PDF
22-38
Israel Holas Allimant, Sergio Holas
PDF
39-54
Ryan Shuvera
PDF
55-68
Ann Werner
PDF
69-83

Articles – Open Section

Ismael de Oliveira Gerolamo
PDF
84-106

Reviews

Nico Thom
PDF
107-109
Marie Thompson
PDF
110-113
Michael Ahlers
PDF
114-116
Benjamin Burkhart
PDF
117-119
Sergio Pisfil
PDF
120-122