Editorial Introduction

Mary Fogarty Woehrel

Abstract


This is the Editorial Introduction for Open Issue 9/2

Keywords


Education; Marxism; Protests

Full Text:

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References


Bibliography

Andrews, B. W., Group Investigation in Music Instruction: A Pedagogical Scenario. Canadian University Music Review, 13, pp.93-103.

Berland, J. and N. Kompridis. 1986. Disciplining the ‘Popular’: Music and Pedagogy.Communication. Information Médias Théories, 8(2), pp.157-169. https://www.persee.fr/doc/comin_1189-3788_1986_num_8_2_1363

Devine, K., 2019. Decomposed: The Political Ecology of Music. MIT Press.

Devine, K. and Alexandrine Boudreault-Fournier (Eds). (forthcoming) Audible Infrastructures: Music, Sound, Media. Oxford University Press.

Frith, S., 2019. Remembrance of Things Past: Marxism and the Study of Popular Music. Twentieth-Century Music, 16(1), pp.141-155.

Gedik, A.C., 2012. Reflections on Popular Music Studies in Turkey. IASPM@ Journal, 2(1-2), pp.51-56. http://dx. doi. org/10.5429/2079-3871 (2011) v2i1-2.6en.

Goldschmitt, K.E., 2019. Bossa Mundo: Brazilian Music in Transnational Media Industries. Oxford University Press.

Green, L., 2002. How popular musicians learn: A way ahead for music education. Ashgate Publishing.

Kelley, R.D., 2002. Freedom dreams: The black radical imagination. Beacon Press.

Robinson, C.J., 2000. Black Marxism: The making of the Black radical tradition. Univ of North Carolina Press.

Vulliamy, G. and Lee, E. --

Popular Music: a teacher's guide. Routledge & Kegan Paul Ltd.

Pop, rock and ethnic music in school. Cambridge University Press.

Theatrical Work

Stars, Abraham, C, & Russell, Z. 2019. Stars: Together. Stars with Atom Egoyan. [Crow’s Theatre, Toronto, Canada, December 4th, 2019]




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